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Article of the Week

1 Sep, 2019
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Excellent perspectives on vaccine safety and strategies to engage publics – HL

Key Actions To Promote Vaccine Acceptance

By Walter A. Orenstein, MD, associate director at Emory Vaccine Center and professor of medicine, pediatrics, and global health at Emory University                           Blog posted on National Foundation for Infectious Diseases (NFID) website

Vaccines are one of the greatest tools used to prevent infectious diseases and their serious complications. CDC recommends all children in the US get vaccinated against 16 infectious diseases—diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio, pneumococcal disease, rotavirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), hepatitis A & B, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella (chickenpox), influenza, human papillomavirus (HPV), and meningococcal disease. Not only do vaccines help prevent infectious diseases, they can also can prevent certain types of cancers. Hepatitis B vaccine, for example, can prevent liver cancer and HPV vaccine can prevent 6 types of cancer including cervical cancer and oral cancer.

Before a vaccine is licensed and recommended for use, it goes through a complex process to ensure it is both safe and effective. This includes preclinical work in the laboratory to demonstrate the vaccine can induce a protective immune response, followed by three phases of clinical trials in humans. This often takes more than a decade, and many vaccine candidates do not successfully make it to licensure. For example, we have been trying to develop a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), for almost four decades and although there are some promising candidates, none yet has met criteria for licensure and recommended use.

Vaccines are one of the greatest tools used to prevent infectious diseases and their serious complications. CDC recommends all children in the US get vaccinated against 16 infectious diseases—diphtheria, tetanus, pertussis (whooping cough), polio, pneumococcal disease, rotavirus, Haemophilus influenzae type b (Hib), hepatitis A & B, measles, mumps, rubella, varicella (chickenpox), influenza, human papillomavirus (HPV), and meningococcal disease. Not only do vaccines help prevent infectious diseases, they can also can prevent certain types of cancers. Hepatitis B vaccine, for example, can prevent liver cancer and HPV vaccine can prevent 6 types of cancer including cervical cancer and oral cancer.

Before a vaccine is licensed and recommended for use, it goes through a complex process to ensure it is both safe and effective. This includes preclinical work in the laboratory to demonstrate the vaccine can induce a protective immune response, followed by three phases of clinical trials in humans. This often takes more than a decade, and many vaccine candidates do not successfully make it to licensure. For example, we have been trying to develop a vaccine against human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), for almost four decades and although there are some promising candidates, none yet has met criteria for licensure and recommended use.

But despite all the evidence of safety and effectiveness of currently recommended vaccines, vaccine hesitancy has become a global problem…..read full article here

This entry was posted on Sunday, September 1st, 2019 at 8:13 am and is filed under Blog.

Videos Video archive

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Commission joined forces to tackle the issue at the first global vaccination summit. Although many of them live in developing countries with poor access to vaccines, scientists are worried that anti-vaccination campaigners in the developed world are spreading misinformation on social media. So what’s the cure for their scepticism?

Emilie Karafillakis, research fellow for the Vaccine Confidence Project, speaks to France 24 about the rising anti-vaccination sentiment that is rising throughout Europe, especially in France where a recent study revealed 1 in 3 citizens believe vaccines are unsafe.

In this episode of Take as Directed, J. Stephen Morrison speaks with Dr. Heidi Larson on why vaccine confidence is currently in crisis, and how this has fueled outbreaks such as measles and the persistence of polio in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Literature Literature archive

L. Tavoschi, F. Quattrone, E. De Vita, P.L. Lopalco 2019 Vaccine Volume 37(49): 7201-7288
Biswal . 2019 NEJM DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1903869
Piot P, Larson HJ, O'Brian KL, et al 2019 NATURE Vol. 575, pages119–129.
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The Vaccine Knowledge Project at the Oxford Vaccine Group