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Confidence Commentary: Blog archive

VACCINES & FAKE NEWS: Analysing measles outbreaks 2019

Heidi Larson | 10 Nov, 2019

 

By  Lola García-Ajofrín

Even though it is a vaccine-preventable disease, measles kills over 100,000 people every year. Worldwide cases tripled in the first three months of 2019. The causes of these outbreaks are diverse: from health infrastructure to civil strife or vaccine hesitancy. In some countries, vaccine-skepticism and populism are increasing together.

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From the Center for Vaccine Ethics & Policy
Vaccines and Global Health: The Week in Review
The European Regional Office of the Vaccine Confidence Project™

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Videos Video archive

The World Health Organization (WHO) and the European Commission joined forces to tackle the issue at the first global vaccination summit. Although many of them live in developing countries with poor access to vaccines, scientists are worried that anti-vaccination campaigners in the developed world are spreading misinformation on social media. So what’s the cure for their scepticism?

Emilie Karafillakis, research fellow for the Vaccine Confidence Project, speaks to France 24 about the rising anti-vaccination sentiment that is rising throughout Europe, especially in France where a recent study revealed 1 in 3 citizens believe vaccines are unsafe.

In this episode of Take as Directed, J. Stephen Morrison speaks with Dr. Heidi Larson on why vaccine confidence is currently in crisis, and how this has fueled outbreaks such as measles and the persistence of polio in Afghanistan and Pakistan.

Literature Literature archive

Biswal . 2019 NEJM DOI: 10.1056/NEJMoa1903869
Piot P, Larson HJ, O'Brian KL, et al 2019 NATURE Vol. 575, pages119–129.
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The Vaccine Knowledge Project at the Oxford Vaccine Group